Beau’s Lines – Definition, Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by letsthinkabout

Beau’s lines are deep grooved lines that run from side to side on the fingernail. They are usually bilateral and result from a temporary cessation in the growth of the nail plate during severe systemic illnesses. It is believed that there is a temporary cessation of cell division in the nail matrix. This may be caused by an infection or problem in the nail fold, where the nail begins to form, or it may be caused by an injury to that area. Although transverse grooves can occur on the nails of one extremity, this has not been a commonly reported phenomenon. An unusual case of unilateral Beau’s line associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the distal radius extending into the growth plate with wrist immobilization is presented. They may look like indentations or ridges in the nail plate. There are several reasons that humans get Beau’s lines. Beau’s lines may be also a sign of malnutrition, zinc or iron deficiency, anemia, any major metabolic condition or a not lasting condition when growth at the area under the cuticle is interrupted by an injury or after a stressful event that temporarily interrupted nail formation.

Beau’s lines may also be caused by an illness of the body, such as diabetes, certain drugs, such as those used in chemotherapy or even malnutrition. Beau’s lines are transverse depressions of all of the nails that appear at the base of the lunula weeks after a stressful event has temporarily interrupted nail formation. The lines progress distally with normal nail growth and eventually disappear at the free edge. They develop in response to many diseases, such as syphilis, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, myocarditis, peripheral vascular disease, and zinc deficiency, and to illness accompanied by high fevers, such as scarlet fever, measles, mumps, and pneumonia. Beau’s lines in the fingernails of 6 divers following a deep saturation dive to a pressure equal to 335 meters of sea water, and in 2 of 6 divers following a similar dive to 305 meters. The lines progress distally with normal nail growth and eventually disappear at the free edge.

Treatment of Beau’s lines Tips

1.Trim brittle nails after a bath or moisturized it.

2.Apply a moisturizer on nails each time you wash your hands.

3.Moisturize cuticles and nails at bedtime and cover them with cotton gloves.

4.Don’t use nail polish remover more than twice a month, touch up the polish.

5.Avoid removers with acetone, which dries nails

6.Chromonychia induced by antineoplastic drugs has a few distinct forms. The most frequent one is melanonychia, a dark pigmentation of nails seen in diffuse, transverse, or longitudinal band patterns.

7.Synergy or an additive effect of chemotherapy agents on cellular proliferation of nail compartments is accountable for the development of this complex pattern.